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Pressurised Escape Training (Buoyant Exhaling Ascent)

The Buoyant exhaling method of ascent was taught to students, to ensure, that if a malfunction of the Escape suit occured and their head and mouth became immersed in water,they would still be able to complete their ascent, the escapee must continue to blow out the expanding air inside his lungs during the remainder of the ascent.


Ladder drill - The correct blowing rate is vitally important and must be perfected before a Buoyant Exhaling ascent can be conducted.





Ladder drill - The correct blowing rate is vitally important and must be perfected with a member of staff before a Buoyant Exhaling ascent can be conducted.

Trainees are then given a full brief prior to entering the lock. The lock will then be flooded and pressurised, the trainees must clear their ears keeping ahead of the increasing pressure until equalisation is reached.

The trainee will be told to take a good deep breath, he will then be pulled into the main body of the tank, when he is blowing out correctly and has been checked he will then be released.

During the ascent the trainee must continue to blow out all the way to the surface and never ever stop trying to blow out.

Safely on the surface the trainee will then be assisted out of the water and continually monitored during this process.

All trainees will then remain standing on a white line for a period of medical observation.

Pressurised Escape Training (The Hooded Ascent)

The Hooded ascent will enable the escapee to breath normally all the way to the surface.
This is achieved as result of the continued expansion of air through the relief valves into the hooded area of the suit.







On completion of a full brief, the trainee will climb into the tower, and be met by a second instructor.

Whilst in the Tower the Escapee must remain plugged in to the air supply, breathing normally & staying ahead of the increasing pressure.



As the trainee exits the tower he would be checked before being released.

During the ascent the trainee will continue to breath normally all the way to the surface.

Safely on the surface the trainee will then be assisted out of the water.

All trainees will then remain standing on a white line for a period of medical observation.

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©2006 Ian Callow